Posts tagged Blog

Far & Wide: A ‘Weekend In The Life’ With @EmanuelSmedbøl & @LittleBrownFox

Meet Emanuel Smedbøl and Megan McLellan, British Columbia natives known globally for their Instagram accounts @EmanuelSmedbol and @LittleBrownFox. From hiking epic mountains to finding the perfect campsites, this adventure couple knows how to enjoy their own backyard on nothing more than a student’s budget. Learn more about these two inspiring creatives in the interview below… (BONUS: Read till the bottom to enjoy the ultimate three-day British Columbia road trip itinerary created by Megan and Emanuel)

Photo: Destination BC
Photo: Destination BC

Caley Vanular: Firstly, tell me a little about yourselves? Who are you and where are you from?

Emanuel Smedbøl: I grew up in a little rural area in BC’s mountainous West Kootenays. It was a pretty idyllic place and my thoughts keep going back, and I try to get back for a month every summer. I first moved to Victoria for university, then later Vancouver to do a diploma in graphic design. I loved the city almost immediately — it seemed so big, so mysterious to a small town kid like me. The city has shrunk over the years as I got to know it better, and I carved out a little space for myself and my routine. But still, such a wonderful city.

Megan McLellan: I was born and raised in Vancouver, BC.  My parents thought that travel was an equally important form of education as school. So, I got used to leaving class and going somewhere with my family every few months. At the time, I didn’t appreciate how hard my parents worked to be able to do that with my family, but it definitely left an impression. I’ve prioritized travel and getting outdoors ever since. But as much as I love to travel internationally, British Columbia definitely still feels like home to me. I love how you can drive four hours in one direction and BC is a hot dry desert. Then, drive four hours in the other direction and BC is a lush wet rainforest with towering trees and a roaring ocean.

CV: The contrast of your backgrounds is so interesting. How did you two end up meeting?

ML: We met at a local Vancouver watering hole, the ANZA (Australian New Zealand Association) Club.

ES: It was pretty awkward TBH… we’re both quiet people and I was actually there with someone else. But that person disappeared and Megan liked my sweater and just sidled up and told me so and that was that. Actually not really. It took a lot of texts and cancelled plans before we hung out again. It took some work but it was worth it.

CV: What do you do for work that allows you to travel so frequently on the weekends?

ML: We both work as photographers (Emanuel also as a graphic designer) and are fortunate enough to sometimes get to travel through that. But we also just take any chance we get to go away, be it an overnighter close to home or a week long road trip.

CV: Megan, as a student at SFU, what are your tips for other students looking to go on more adventures?

ML: Haha, I actually craft my schedule so that I take as many classes as I can in as few days possible. Probably not the best plan for everybody. But if I can take four classes in two days it means I have the whole rest of the week off to potentially go away. But I’ve also been working on my degree off and on for so long now, I’ve taken a lot of semesters off to work or travel. Getting outside somehow always has a way of putting things in perspective, so I view making time for it as important as getting any assignments or essays done.

CV: Emanuel are you a freelancer? How do you find balancing work and play?

E:  I worked full time with a little non-profit straight out of college for a couple years, paid off the student loans, then took a summer off to go on an extended bicycle trek. Going back to work was a little more difficult after that… but freelancing has opened up possibilities quite a bit. I often try to work evenings or weekends so I can be out exploring or camping during weekdays when it’s quieter. There are lean years with more play than work but so far it’s worked out ok. These days, I’ve been adding adventure photography to my list of services, so that helps.

CV: Your blog Field & Forest is awe-inspiring; can you tell us how the blog came to fruition?

ML: Hey thanks! It was something we had been thinking about doing for a while. We wanted to create a space dedicated to showcasing photos that told a narrative, and share some of the stories that make adventure feel more approachable, more doable and more human.

Our trips are rarely perfect expeditions and a lot can go wrong. When possible, we wanted to share that side and make it feel more attainable and hopefully inspire other people as well. We want to let people know you don’t need to plan everything down to a T, but to always be as prepared as possible for the real elements of the wilderness.  If you forget your tent (in the summer), it’s ok: you’ll get a couple bug bites but you’ll feel that fresh forest wind all night.  You just might maybe potentially be better for it.

ES: We eventually started soliciting submissions and sharing other people’s adventure stories on a little side blog called The Journal. It’s been a very rewarding experience. There are so many great places to explore.

CV: On Field & Forest you mention that you wanted to create a space for people who, “aren’t extreme athletes or wealthy or whatever to have a good time outdoors” what inspired this?

ES: It was mostly inspired by feedback we got whenever we went on trips. When we rode our bicycles from Vancouver down to Mexico in 2010, people were just floored. We constantly got questions about how long we trained for or what type of fancy bikes we had, when in reality we pretty much just hopped on our old 10 speeds one day and went for it. When you think about it as a whole, yeah it was a long trip, but we took it just day by day, hill by hill, and it was so manageable. We wanted to share that you can make do with what you have — you don’t need any fancy stuff or a ripped bod or anything. Just a weekend off, some shoes, a sleeping bag, some snacks and a water bottle and you’re good. You can go virtually anywhere. Though maybe a boat would be good too.

CV: Have you two always been into photography? Did Instagram have anything to do with your interest in Photography?

ES: I’ve liked taking photos for a long time. I first picked up my dad’s old film camera in grade 10 and loved it straight away. I went through a long string of half broken camera bodies before getting a DSLR… but then it was so big and so heavy that I rarely took it anywhere. Instagram definitely changed that. My photos never really had much of an audience before, and getting feedback provided drive and purpose. For the first couple years I just shot on an IPhone, then I doubled up shooting both IPhone and camera, then said to heck with that and now mostly just shoot on a camera.

ML: I never really started taking photos until I met Emanuel, or not seriously anyway. I had a film camera that I used a bit when I went on trips but that was it. After Emanuel and I biked down south I started thinking about photography a bit more. And, truth be told it was mostly because I was tired of waiting for him all the time. We would get to a destination and I would see it in 30 minutes and it would take him three hours. I joined Instagram just for fun, but it turned out to be really helpful for getting feedback and learning from others.

CV: Where are some of your favourite weekend trips in British Columbia? Can you share some images of your favourite places?

ML: Oh there are so many good places! From Vancouver, we have easy access to Tofino, the Gulf Islands, the mountains, the Fraser Canyon and the Cascades around Hope. You can literally head off in any direction. We are big believers in taking ‘extra loooong’ weekends whenever you can. Even if you only have one night there are so many great hikes and quick camping spots to check out.

ES: But really the whole province is pretty beautiful. We’re actually writing this from the road, we’re on a two-month road trip up to see Northern BC for the first time! We’re only on day five but it already feels like we’re running out of time, there are so many places we want to see.

ML: Here are seven of our favourite places in British Columbia:

1: Tofino / Pacific Rim National Park Reserve

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“We love the wet west coast weather, the raw feel of the elements, the wave-battered beaches, islands, and lush rainforests.”

2: Yoho National Park

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“Stunning mountain trails and lakes with peacock hues of greens, turquoise, blues.”

3: St Marks Summit on Vancouver’s North Shore / Cypress Provincial Park

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“One of our favourite local hikes! Beautiful views down into Howe Sound.”

4: Lake Lovely Water in Tantalus Provincial Park

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“The Tantalus Mountains are a familiar sight on the Sea to Sky Hwy to Whistler but are kind tricky to get to (hence the name). You either have to crawl across a raging glacier river on a little wire or hire a helicopter to get up. But either way, it’s worth it”

5: The Nemiah Valley in BC’s Chilcotin

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“I learned a bit about this area in one of my anthropology classes in university. Very fascinating history, and was essentially isolated from the rest of BC until the 1970s. It has a lot of wild horses and BC’s largest alpine lake and some mighty stunning mountains”

6: The Valhalla Mountains

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“The mountains I first cut my teeth on in BC’s interior. These mountains will always be home.”

7: Canoeing down the Slocan Lake

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“We do this as a family trip with my mum every summer. 5 days of canoeing down the lake, sleeping on beaches and swimming a lifetime’s worth of swims. It can’t be beat.”

CV: All the locations in your images are so impressive. What does a long ‘weekend in the life’ look like for you two? Can you create a three-day trip for the readers?

ML: One trip we’re saving for a rainy day is the Coast Mountain Circle Loop. It’s close to Vancouver and about easy three days in a car if you don’t stop for overnight hikes along the way (of which there are plenty!). You pass through some pretty interesting terrain. Should be a good one! And if anyone ends up doing it before us, feel free to send us any tips or recommendations!

 

Day 1:

Where to go: Drive north up the Sea to Sky (HWY 99) through Squamish and Whistler to Pemberton.

Where to stay: One of the little Forest Recreation sites north of town.

What to do: Stop and marvel at the cascading islands and mountains plunging into Howe Sound. Stop and hike the Stawamus Chief. Stop and check out the trails into Garibaldi and then take a gondola up Whistler Blackcomb.

What to eat: Start with a big breakfast at home then eat crackers and cheese for the rest of the day. Or if you’ve been extra good maybe you deserve lunch at Fergie’s in Squamish.

What to pack: Hiking boots, maps, a tent and lots of snacks!

 

Day 2:

Where to go: Continue east on Hwy 99 towards Lillooet, then take Hwy 12 south to Lytton.

Where to stay: Camp out on the side of a quiet desert road listening to lonely coyote calls.

What to do: Take a detour down to Lillooet Lake for a soak in the hot springs or hike up and see the turquoise waters and glaciers of Joffre Lakes. Or, take a long look down the arid Seton Lake valley. There are a lot of lakes! But save time for the Fraser Canyon — we haven’t been down this section but it’s probably really very nice.

What to eat: Oatmeal and apples for breakfast, more crackers and cheese for lunch, hot pasta and broccoli for dinner.

 

Day 3:

Where to go: From Lytton hop onto the Trans Canada which will take you way back to Vancouver. Or, you can jump off the freeway at Hope onto Hwy 7 for a quieter route through some of Vancouver’s more scenic suburbs.

What to do: Stop and swim in the chain of lakes at Nahatlatch Provincial Park. See the boiling roiling rapids of Hells Gate. Peruse for antiques and goat skulls at the Yale Community Flea Market. Have another swim in Silver Lake National Park just north of Hope. Drive up the rough road to Jones Lake for some beautiful mountain views.

What to eat: Fried chicken and waffles at Fat Jacks in Boston Bar! Then save your appetite for a big sushi dinner back in Vancouver.

Far & Wide: Normandy Shoppe Owners Interview

Photo: Oledenim
Photo: Oledenim

Meet Amanda Redmon, Christopher Saniuk, and their mini auburn-coated golden doodle named Norman. Longtime Winnipeg locals, Amanda and Chris have a deep connection to the community and a clear eye for high-quality goods and aesthetics. On top of that, this good looking family also founded and recently sold one of Winnipeg’s finest menswear, housewares, accessories and lifestyle stores @NormandyShoppe. Thus, when we wanted to learn more about the growing Canadian city, there were no better people to ask than this power couple.

Itinerary from Amanda and Christopher ensures you will find the best of the best in Winnipeg. So what are you waiting for? Here are the best places to shop and snack in The Peg!

The Exchange District

Forth

A good Saturday morning. #forthwpg

A photo posted by Forth (@forth_wpg) on

The team behind Parlour and Lil Sister Coffee have brought a heritage building back to life with the creation of Forth. It’s a coffee roaster, a cocktail bar, a cafe, an art gallery and an event space. Forth has a little bit of everything and is a must see for those passing through Winnipeg. @forth_wpg | 171 McDermott Ave

Into the Music

Give yourself a few hours to scan through everything one of Winnipeg’s oldest record stores has to offer. No matter your taste in music, you’ll end up leaving with an old favourite or a new artist (or two). / 245 McDermott Ave

Tiny Feast

Heaps of lovely cads for mum in the shop! 👉🏻Mother's Day is Sunday, May 8.

A photo posted by Tiny Feast (@tinyfeast) on

If you’ve got a soft spot for quality greeting cards, stationary, calendars, office supplies, textiles or if you’re looking for a great house warming gift, you’ll have to check out Tiny Feast. @tinyfeast | 217 McDermott Ave

Antiques and Funk

Photo adventure in the Exchange District today 🙌🏼 #wpg365 #fromhereandaway

A photo posted by Zachary Oulton (@zachoulton) on

Antiques and Funk is a Winnipeg institution for anyone who prefers their housewares to come with a story. The treasure chest of a store carries everything from the old to unusual in one room. | 474 main

Downtown

Goodwill Social Club

If you can’t decide whether you want a coffee or a Caesar cocktail or maybe a piece of pizza, then stop in at Goodwill. It’s the best new venue in Winnipeg for live music and events like Drag Queen Bingo, Motown Mondays, and awesome weekly karaoke in the city. @thatgoodwill / 625 Portage Ave

Modern Supply Co. + Thom Bargen

A tropical paradise in the middle of downtown! Grab a coffee from the team at Thom Bargen and pass through the glass doors to Modern Supply Co. You’ll find a beautiful shop filled with ethically sourced housewares, womenswear, skin care, accessories and tropical plants, and you won’t find a selection like this anywhere else in the city. @modernsupplyco | @thombargen | 250 Kennedy St

Urban Bakery

Nike Roshe NM TP. Men's sizes 8-12 up for grabs. $140 #Winnipeg #WpgsGotSole

A photo posted by TUB // The Urban Bakery (@tub204) on

The original tastemakers for street wear and sneaker heads in Winnipeg since 1999, Urban Bakery is a great stop for casual wear for men and women. @tub204 / 407 graham Ave

West Broadway/Osborne

Tallest Poppy

We are open today. We have fried chicken and mimosa.

A photo posted by The Tallest Poppy (@tallestpoppy) on

Home of the best chicken and waffles in Winnipeg and also an impressive cocktail list, Tallest Poppy also host the occasional party, which is guaranteed a good time. @tallestpoppy | 103 Sherbrook Ave

Lil Sister Coffee

Serving up your Friday coffee + treats allllllll day. ✌🏻️ Photo by @fullwpg

A photo posted by Little Sister Coffee Maker (@lilsistercoffee) on

Lil Sister Coffee is the cutest little coffee shop in the city, a fantastic place for a pit stop on your adventures around Winnipeg, and never short on good vibes and a great selection of baked goods, warm and cool drinks. @lilsistercoffee / 470 River Ave

Off The Beaten Path

A l’epi de ble

Hands down the best bakery in the city. You might end up leaving with one of everything, including a loaf of fresh baked bread, a dozen macaroons, and a couple pastries. Just make sure you get there nice and early before your favourites are sold out. | 1757 Main St, Winnipeg.

Want to see the full post on Far & Wide, click here.

Well Travelled: Northern Peru

Committed to promoting truth through storytelling, Jessica Yurasek regularly partners with nonprofits and social good startups. Her work has brought her to over 40 countries, including a recent river journey in Peru. Enjoy Jessica’s words and photos…

The Amazon rainforest is one of the most biodiverse places on the planet. I set out from Iquitos, a port town in Northern Peru, for a river expedition up the Marañon into the remote jungle. River travel is contemplative, slow and steady. The great waters flow into the distance, weaving through lush green as far as the eye can see. It is from this vantage that I came to truly understand how important the Amazon rainforest is.

 

Made a few new friends on the boat

Made a few new friends on the boat

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The spirit of Iquitos can be seen in the details

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Collecting starfruit and curiously delicious camu camu at the market

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Rice, corn, fried chicken and plantains are staple foods here

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Welcomed into a village leader’s home for lunch

Before the sun sets along the river we stop in Maipuco

Before the sun sets along the river we stop in Maipuco

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The forest is thick, alive, and filled with curiosities

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Departing from Nauta to head up the great Marañon River

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The indigenous people of Cuninico

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Continuing down a small tributary

Again we set out on the river and go deeper into the jungle

Again we set out on the river and go deeper into the jungle

 

View the full post on the Herschel Supply Blog. 

Destination Canada: A Local’s Guide To Whistler

 

A Local’s Guide To Riding Whistler

The many sides of Whistler Photos: Caley Vanular

Whistler BC, is an amazing place to grow up. The beautiful outdoors, inspiring people and unmatched terrain is an experience only those who visit can truly understand. Especially in the past few years. With the arrival of new restaurants, facilities, retail stores, terrain access, express lifts and more, Whistler has grown from a small ski town to a globally renowned ski resort, featuring a community filled with amazing opportunities for action, adventure, cuisine, and culture.

Follow along as I give you some locals tips to skiing and snowboarding in one of the best places on earth, for the easy riders, powder hounds, park rats and backcountry enthusiasts in your group…

 

I woke up surrounded by Delicas.#onthemoon #canada #explorebc #mountain

A photo posted by Caley Vanular (@caleyvanular) on

Back in our natural habitat with @barkerfoto @katlynmurdza A photo posted by Caley Vanular (@caleyvanular) on


For The Easy Riders:

Whistler Blackcomb is a huge resort, with over 8,171 acres of skiable terrain. It is smart to take a look at the trail map to get an idea of where you want to ski before you hit the slopes. My favorite morning runs are on the green Family Runs. Featuring beautiful scenery and perfect corduroy, it is a nice way to ease into the morning.

 

Dropping next. #pipejocks #wssf #shredshow #boarding #funtimes @duckworth

A photo posted by Caley Vanular (@caleyvanular) on

 

For The Park Rats: If you or someone in your family is looking to ride park, Whistler Blackcomb has some of the best terrain parks in the world. Ranging from green to extreme, the resort has something for everyone. Whistler’s park is traditionally the novice level park, with fun jibs and welcoming jumps. Blackcomb terrain park is built on a steeper run and hosts a blue, grey and black park. The black park is where you will see professional athletes and Olympians training, it has the biggest jumps and requires a special pass and helmet to ride.

 

Above the clouds. A photo posted by Caley Vanular (@caleyvanular) on

 

For The Powder Hounds:

Looking for powder on Whistler Blackcomb? You will need to know where to go. If you are on Whistler and see Peak Chair switch from ‘closed’ to ‘stand-by’, rip on over and jump in line. When it opens, you will experience amazing snow, endless terrain, and big open bowls. Ride back down to the lift and enjoy a show as skiers and snowboarders drop off cliffs viewable from the lift line. You can lap Peak Chair to Red Chair, all day and explore different routes and traverses leading you to some of the best terrain the resort has to offer.

If it is too windy to open Peak Chair on Whistler, take the Peak-To-Peak gondola over to Blackcomb. Blackcomb mountain is steeper and features the new Crystal Ridge Express chair which gives you access to playful terrain and powder-filled glades.

 

In the belly with my good ol’boardin pal @luisakhp. @whistlerblackcomb #powday #trees #neature

A photo posted by Caley Vanular (@caleyvanular) on

To the Peak. @whistlerblackcomb A photo posted by Caley Vanular (@caleyvanular) on

A photo posted by Caley Vanular (@caleyvanular) on

A photo posted by Caley Vanular (@caleyvanular) on

So many fun things to do just off the Duffy.

A photo posted by Caley Vanular (@caleyvanular) on

 

For The Backcountry Enthusiasts:

Not only does Whistler play host to the world-renowned ski resort, Whistler Blackcomb, it also has numerous backcountry access points within a thirty-minute drive. From epic heli skiing, snowmobiling to split boarding, it is worth checking out the operations in the area and getting yourself a guided tour of the surrounding mountains. Only if you want bottomless powder and no lift lines that is…  

 

Lunch break. #cave #natureporn A photo posted by Caley Vanular (@caleyvanular) on

Such a great day : ) #lotsoflols #sunshine #backcountry

A photo posted by Caley Vanular (@caleyvanular) on

To learn more about exploring Whistler, British Columbia follow @GoWhistler on Twitter.

For more photos from life in Whistler follow me @CaleyVanular on Instagram.

To view this post on The Canadian Tourism Commission’s website visit here. 

Well Travelled: Hawaii

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Based in Squamish, British Columbia, Canada, professional wedding and lifestyle photographer Rebecca Bundschuh shares her words and photos from an inspirational trip to beautiful Hawaii…

Travelling with a family is a different beast. The responsibility of caring for others while navigating new surroundings can present challenges. Those who persevere are often rewarded, like I was while exploring the magical land of Hawaii with my children. I love the comfort and excitement of experiencing new places with them and capturing those moments with my camera.

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Another beautiful beach, another beautiful bay.

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The details of paradise.

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Getting my daily dose of Vitamin Sea.

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Wrapping the beach around me.

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Walking on the golden sand.

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Meditate and let the waves wash it away.

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Different directions.

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Outdoor shower.

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Getting into the swing of things.

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The essence of yin and yang.

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Reflections in a rabbit hole.

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My goodie bag.

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We are #WellTravelled.

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Every surfboard has a story.

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Never want to leave this paradise.

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Sunlight shining through the storm.

Did you enjoy Hawaii? Explore the rest of the Well Travelled series and view more of Rebecca’s photography here.

Selected Sounds: Mystery Jets

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Emerging as part of the London indie-rock scene around 2005, The Mystery Jets are an English Indie Rock band, formerly based on Eel Pie Island in London. Recently launching their fourth studio album Radlands, the Mystery Jets have transformed their sound yet again drawing inspiration from Austin, Texas southern rock roots. Get acquainted with The Mystery Jets, and listen along as Blaine Harrison, lead vocalist, shares a playlist of his favourite tracks for this week’s Selected Sounds.hsc-selected-sounds-mystery-jets

Photo: Rachael Wright

1. How do you find the music you listen to?

I go through periods of picking up all the music papers and going on amazon binges. I think it’s to do with obsessively needing to feel connected to all the new music being released in the world, but then I have periods of resorting back to just listening to Neil Young albums. And my record collection was a pretty good reflection of that. But then my car got stolen with most of my Neil Young records in it. So now i’m just left with all the other crap.

2. What is your favourite way to enjoy music?

Driving around in my car (before it got stolen). I could never understand why people drove, or equally what the purpose of CDs were. But the minute i put my key in the ignition it all made perfect sense. Music sounds so much better with lights flying past you at 90 mph on the motorway

3. What excites you about finding new music?

I think a big part of it comes from that feeling of discovery, and wanting to keep it to yourself. But if a record is really great, other people will start talking about it too, and slowly this thing which went from being your secret, is everyone else’s secret too and then you hear it in H&M and something inside you dies. I think that’s why a lot of band’s early fans end up deserting them in time. From the perspective of someone who plays in a band, i see the arc of a band’s career as being like a long, meandering train ride. People are going to get off at some stations and others are going to get on. Some of them will realize they caught the wrong train, but others will stay and ride it till the wheels come off.

4. What tracks/and or artists comprise your personal soundtrack right now?

Im listening to a lot of space rock. There is a lot of rock around but not enough space. Certainly not in Pop music. Actually i think that is why people really took to artists like the XX and James Blake, because there is room to breathe in their music. For the first time in so long you could actually hear something on the radio that had dynamic range instead of all this disgustingly compressed crap that made you feel like your brain was being squished out of your ears. They call it ‘brickwalling’.

Alex from the Monkeys recently commented that all he listens to know is hip hop which is exactly what he did before guitar music came back around ten years ago. And i feel kind of the same way. We are at the end of a cycle. All the stokes have kids and are recovering alcoholics. The scene isn’t as tribal as it was when we came out, everyones kind of out there, floating on their own. I think thats why i’m listening to a lot of space rock.

5. Who do you trust to give an honest evaluation of new tracks?

As in who do i play my own new music to? I guess my dad, he is very involved with my songs, we finish the words together. I bring him the lyrics and basically say ‘make this sound eloquent and articulate!’. But mostly I am quite private with it until the last moment. Iv’e always felt the creative process is a lot like childbirth in so many ways. Why would you want to tell the world all about your baby before its even born? i mean, it might have red hair, it might have black hair, who knows? it might not want you to tweet videos of it to everyone you know before it even knows what it is. I feel like that about songs. But then after we put the record out i always distance myself from it. The mastering process is the last time i usually hear the album and then i’m done. I have to step away or else i carry on hearing all the things i still want to change, but by that time it’s too late. You have to relinquish control and go let it out into the world and live a life of it’s own.

View the full interview on Herschel Supply 

Well Travelled: Kalalau Trail, Hawaii.

Herschel Supply Well Travelled

The 11 mile trail edges beautiful cliffs and provides a scenic view of waterfalls and steep narrow valleys leading to the wild ocean. Take a moment to view images and words from Caley Vanular below.

The journey starts off with a well travelled two mile hike in mud… Watch your step.

Take a break at the first beach.

Have a snack and soak up some rays.

Watch the power of the ocean.

Double knot your laces, you are in for a long walk.

The endless path ways, rugged river crossings and step valleys below are sure to keep your mind racing as you walk the 11 mile trail.

The long and testing trail eventually comes to an end in a big open oasis.

Wild green grass and vibrant red mud welcomes you to the start of paradise.

Finally. Your sore muddy feet have made it to paradise, Kalalau Beach. Take off your shoes, jump in the ocean and sleep in the caves. Stay as long as you can, this is beach is just the beginning…

To view more photo-essays from the Well Travelled series, click here.

W5&H: Mikey LeBlanc Interview

Herschel Supply W5&H

Mikey LeBlanc was once a professional Snowboarder and now co-founder of Holden Outerwear. Below are Mikey’s words on life and such, straight from the heart.

1. Who are you? I have no idea. Really.

2. What do you do? First and foremost, try and spread love.

I work for and co-founded/ co-own HOLDEN Outerwear.

I handle marketing, and like most small businesses many more things day to day.

I enjoy, snowboarding, photos, bike rides, good conversation, etc.

3. Where do you live? VENICE, CA, USA, PLANET EARTH

4. When are you most productive? When I act freely, and I don’t resist any part of the situation at hand.

5. Why outerwear? We make eco-friendlier clothes to keep people feeling good, warm and stylely.

6. How did you get your start? My Mom and Dad this time around. At work I started as a professional snowboarder with an idea to make outerwear that looked like what we wanted to wear every day, and functioned exceptionally well. No one was making gear that transitioned from the MTN to the Street, thats why HOLDEN was a necessity. Before that came skateboarding, which exposed me to so many things, art, music, style, freedom.

 

To view more interviews from the W5&H series, click here.